Ronald Labonte

Professor and Holder of the Canada Research Chair in Contemporary Globalization and Health Equity
Univesity of Ottawa

Canada
Ronald Labonté is Distinguished Research Chair in Globalization and Health Equity and Professor in the School of Public Health and Epidemiology, University of Ottawa. He holds additional professorships at Flinders University (South Australia) and Maastricht University (Netherlands) and the University of Saskatchewan. He has worked extensively with UN agencies, governments, and civil society organizations, and chaired the Globalization Knowledge Network for the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. He is active with the People’s Health Movement, a frequent contributor to its flagship publication Global Health Watch, and a co-editor of its forthcoming 6th edition. His research focuses on the health equity impacts of diverse globalization processes, including health worker migration; medical tourism; global health diplomacy; trade, political economy and tobacco control; trade and food security; health impact assessments of trade and investment treaties; comprehensive primary health care reforms; the social determinants of health equity; and health and foreign policy. Most recently has begun a research program on the global governance of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance, and co-leads Canadian-based international Global One Health Network (http://global1hn.ca/). His most recent books are Health Equity in a Globalizing Era (Oxford University Press, 2019); and Trade Agreements and Public Health (Palgrave MacMillan 2020). He is Editor-in-Chief of the BMC journal, Globalization and Health. Before joining academia in this full time capacity in 1999, he worked for 15 years in public health settings across all three Canadian government levels, and 10 years consulting internationally, producing a body of work on health promotion practice, community development/empowerment, public health policy, and what are now known as the ‘social (or societal) determinants of health.’